Anthocyanins
 
STRONGEST PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVE COMPOUNDS: ANTHOCYANINS
 
 
  • BEAUTIFUL NATURAL PLANT PIGMENT
Anthocyanins may sound unfamiliar to daily nutritional words you use when you eat and drink, however, anthocyanins have been present and are a very important yet unknown nutrition in your daily life. Those anthocyanins are naturally contained in radishes, potato, beans, red cabbages, raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, blackcurrants and many other fruits and vegetables.

Anthocyanins are considered as plant pigments-natural colorants responsible not only for the red, purple and blue colors of many fruits and vegetables but also for the reddish violets and pink colors of cereal grains and various beautiful flowers.
 
 
 
  • MIRACLE PROMOTER AND PROTECTER

These natural colorants of anthocyanins also serve to attract insects for fertilization and propagation and to protect against ultraviolet radiation damage for fruits, berries and flowers.
 
Those unique compounds are naturally occurring in trace quantities in flowers and low concentrations in fruits and vegetables, ranging approximately from 60 ppm to 1,000 ppm.

 

The six anthocyanins used to color food are found in the following fruits and vegetables:
  • Cyanidin –Blackcurrants, Raspberries, elderberries, red cabbage
  • Delphinidin – blackcurrants, Blueberries
  • Malvidin – Grape,
  • Pelargonidin - Strawberries and radishes
  • Peonidin - Cranberries
  • Petunidin - Blueberries
Anthocyanins are soluble in water and are appropriate for coloring low pH systems. For most anthocyanins, the lower the pH, the more intense and stable is the color. As the pH increases, the anthocyanins lose intensity and become bluer, at higher than pH4.5 like blackcurrant pigment.
 
 
  • ANTHOCYANINS –FLAVONOIDS FAMILY – POLYPHENOL GROUP  

The Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University have identified more than 4,000 flavonoids family members to which anthocyanins belong as natural occurring pigments and also as a protector against natural enemies.

The flavonoids are the largest family of polyphenol compounds, but, although all flavonoids are polyphenols, polyphenols are not necessarily  flavonoids. Plants produce flavonoids as a protection against parasites, oxidative injury and harsh climatic conditions. Flavonoids are further divided in several subclasses: anthocyanins, flavanols, flavanones, flavonols, flavones and isoflavones and approximately 600 categorized anthocyanins being identified in the family of flavonoids. Out of all anthocyanins, Delphinidin and Cyanidin are the most interesting anthocyanin aglicons.
 
 
 
  • MOST BIOACTIVE ANTHOCYANINS OF BLACKCURRANT BERRY
Blackcurrant berry is the only plant out of the whole fruits, vegetables and flowers, which contains 100% of the anthocyanins composed only by Delphinidin and Cyanidin compositions.

Those unique anthocyanin compositions of Delphinidin and Cyanidin are highly valued for their effects on visual acuity and blood flow increase of large and small blood vessels. Blackcurrant contains one of the highest anthocyanin levels, even higher than blackberry or Bilberry.

Anthocyanins are by far the most bioactive molecules carrying the strongest physiological effects of any plant compounds according to Nutrition Science News (the December2001 issue)
 
 





 
 
                                    Comparison of ORAC Value
 
 
  • UNIQUE ANTHOCYANIN COMPOSITION OFFERS REMARKABLE BENEFITS
Anthocyanins are phenolic pigments and powerful antioxidants found in fruit and vegetables, specifically as dark pigments created by the fruit for its own protection. The largest group of water-soluble pigments in the plant kingdom is flavonoids, which possess high levels of antioxidant activity.
 
Laboratory research has indicated that anthocyanins may aid in human health by reducing disease risk when included in the diet for extended periods. One recent study [ACE30TechBull7] also proved that phytonutrients including anthocyanins, flavonoids, vitamins and minerals, which are all found in blackcurrant berries, work to scavenge harmful free radicals and protect against oxidative damage. Oxidative stress is a key cause of brain degeneration, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, cancer and advanced aging. 
  • NEW ZEALAND BLACKCURRANT CONTAINS LARGEST AMOUNT OF ANTHOCYANINS IN COMPARISON TO BLACKCURRANTS GROWN IN OTHER COUNTRIES
Just the Berries grows the highest anthocyanin rich blackcurrants in the world. This cultivar produces fruits with an anthocyanin content of 1,200 mg per 100 g vs. 400-500mg of other sources. This is attributed to the ideal growing conditions of New Zealand, along with the proprietary cultivation technology of Just the Berries growers. No other blackcurrant berries in the world can compete with the anthocyanin content found in Just the Berries’ New Zealand Blackcurrants.
 
The remarkable concentration of unique anthocyanins found in these berries exhibit the ability to combat cancer, aging, influenza and inflammation, while fighting neurological diseases. The New Zealand Blackcurrant anthocyanin composition has also been linked to improving cardiovascular, digestive, and immune health while supporting healthy vision functions and overall women’s health.
There are four main anthocyanins found specifically in the New Zealand Blackcurrant: delphinidin-3-rutinoside (D3R) cyanidin-3-rutinoside (C3R), delphinidin-3-glucoside (D3G) and cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G). These four components comprise of 98% of the berry’s total anthocyanin content, and this unique combination is not found in any other fruit. These anthocyanin elements are believed to provide the most health benefits for humans, specifically vision, brain and anti-inflammatory support.
According to research completed in New Zealand, NZ blackcurrant cultivars have higher anthocyanin and polyphenol levels when compared to blackcurrants from other sources. Research by the New Zealand Institute for Crop and Food Research (CFR) revealed that the anthocyanin content of European blackcurrants is 250-500mg per 100g (average) whereas the content in NZ blackcurrants is much higher, 570mg per 100g (average). Ben ard and Ben Rua, blackcurrant species unique to New Zealand, are high yielding varieties grown on a large commercial scale and have approximately 25% higher anthocyanin levels than blackcurrants from Poland, Canada, Scotland and Sweden.